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Social Science, Social Change and the Camera

Posted in PHOT 154 by Paul Turounet on July 21, 2010

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Chapter Summary Response

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  1. Identify the following images by name of artist or by title if name unknown.
  2. What was the official known name of the section of the photographic activity of the Farm Security Administratiion (F.S.A.) during the Depression?  Who supervised and directed the section?  What was the purpose of section?  Name six photographers hired by the F.S.A. discussed in the chapter.
  3. Discuss the approach and formula August Sander used to photograph his subjects.  Discuss how Sander’s approach has been a touchstone for past and present Conceptual artists.  Name the photographers who were influenced by Sander for their ongoing sequences of antiquated technological structures?
  4. Name the photographer whose work was most closely associated with the beauty of scientific photography.  What technique did he help develop?  Discuss how the technique was used and perfected.
  5. Name the photographer known for making “one of the twentieth century’s most famous war photographs” from the Spanish Civil War.  What is the title of the photograph?  Discuss the nature of the controversy of this photograph.  What was the statement by this photographer that became the dictum for subsequent generations of war photographers?
  6. What did newspapers and magazines stress during World War II to avoid disclosing information to the enemy?  Name the two photographers responsible for taking photographs of flag-raising moments of national pride.  Name the photographer who photographed the Buchenwald and Dachau concentration camps and what did she cable her editor about the photographs?

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Submit responses online below or download and complete the pdf questionnaire, PHOT 154 Chapter 9 Summary.pdf

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